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Abstract

Since late 1970s, the Chinese economy has grown tremendously. Meanwhile, its intellectual property has also improved as a consequence of foreign pressures on the so-called “one-copy” country. China protects computer software under its copyright law, but the protection contains numerous loopholes which render its broad purpose meaningless. While the Act protects software in general, specific aspects of that protection are treated separately. The Act also creates exceptions and uses ambiguous terms to give the government leeway to reap fruits of software engineers without compensating it. In analyzing litigated software infringement cases, the author, though praising the impact of the decisions, nevertheless criticizes the problems such as lack of enforcement and failure in judiciary and prosecution responsibilities of the Chinese government in protecting software. China has made modest progress, but there is still much work to be done.