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Authors

Cole C. Hardy

Abstract

Under the Lanham Act there is no remedy for individuals when imposters register user names with corresponding post-domain paths containing protected trademarks on social network websites. While Twitter temporarily experimented with its own verification process, it currently does not help users of its site distinguish trademark owners’ pages from the imposters’ pages. Current law discouraging such activity only applies to domain names. This article proposes that with a minor change to the ACPA, the Lanham Act could be updated to help trademark owners protect their rights when infringing activity is experienced with social networking handles and the corresponding post-domain paths.